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Dealing with Lower Back Pain

Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Self Care Tidbits | 1 comment

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Lower back pain is one of the most common conditions and one of the leading causes of physician visits in the United States. In fact, at least four out of five adults will experience lower back pain at some point in their lives.

Ironically, the severity of the pain is often unrelated to the extent of physical damage. A simple back strain with muscle spasms can cause excruciating back pain that can make it difficult to walk or even stand. This is in contrast to a large herniated disc or completely degenerated disc which can be completely painless. There are many structures in the lower back that can cause pain and the causes of low back pain can be very complex. The following parts of spinal anatomy can cause pain:

  • The large nerve roots in the low back that go to the legs and arms may be irritated
  • The smaller nerves that innervate the spine in the low back may be irritated
  • The large paired lower back muscles, known as the erector spine, may be strained
  • The bones, ligaments or joints may be injured
  • The inter-vertebral disc may be injured.

It is important to note that many types of lower back pain have no known anatomical cause.  The pain is still real, though and needs help and attention. However, usually lower back pain can be linked to general causes, like a muscle strain or a specific and diagnosable condition like a degenerative disc disease or a lumbar herniated disc.

Chiropractic manipulation or physiotherapy can help but the vast majority of lower back pain conditions get better with time.

One of the best things you can do on your own to help overcome lower back pain is bent leg push-up.   Do 20 in the morning and 20 in the evening.  Amazingly, another ancient method of self-adjustment is sneezing. The sneeze response is one of the body’s natural chiropractic responses. Sniffing ground pepper and sneezing has helped thousands to walk again. With each sneeze it may hurt, but eventually will come relief, until finally there is remission of pain.

1 Comment

  1. You really hit the nail on the head when you said the severity of the pain is often unrelated to the extent of physical damage. A month ago, after a rambunctious game of basketball I experienced excruciating back pain. Thinking a good night’s rest would have me back to normal I went off to bed but when I woke up the next morning after a pain- filled, sleepless night, I could not stand. The pain was so bad I was convinced that I must have done some serious damage. After a thorough check up the doctor said that it was nothing more than a back sprain with muscle spasms and I would be okay with some rest, medication and some treatment measures that he prescribed. He was right. Today I feel fine but I still find it difficult to believe that that severe pain was due to a simple muscle spasm.

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