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Bacteria – The Good and The Bad!

Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Self Care Tidbits | 0 comments

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Bacteria grow in a wide variety of habitats and conditions. When most people think of bacteria, they think of “disease-causing” organisms. While pathogenic bacteria are notorious for such diseases as cholera, tuberculosis and gonorrhoea, such disease-causing species are a comparatively tiny fraction of the bacteria as a whole.

Because bacteria are so widespread, it is only possible to make the most general statements about their life history and ecology. Bacteria may be found on the tops of mountains, the bottom of the deepest oceans, in the guts of animals and even in the frozen rocks and ice of Antarctica. They have the ability to go dormant for an extended period of time which is a factor that has enabled them to spread so far and last so long.

When the bacteria are eating or breaking down filth in the body mostly from plaque, they create bacterial infections. They are doing their job, they are not attacking you. You’re eating habits and lifestyle or an accident has given them a home.

When the presence and growth of micro-organism damage host tissue, bacterial infections are the result. The extent of infection is generally determined by how many organisms are present and the toxins they release and generally how “inviting” the environment is. Worldwide, internal filth and the accompanying bacterial infections are responsible for more deaths than any other cause.

Symptoms can include inflammation and swelling, pain, heat, redness and loss of function. The most important risk factors are burns; sever trauma, low white blood cell counts, people on immunotherapy treatment and anyone with malnutrition or vitamin deficiency resulting from a poor diet.

Generally, bacteria are spread from an already infected person to the newly infected person. The most common invasion routes are inhalation of airborne bacteria, ingestion into the stomach from dirty hands or utensils or through contaminated food or water. You can also contract the bacteria through direct contact with an infected area of another person’s body, contaminated blood or by insect bite.

Research shows great promise for a novel concept:  FERMENTED FOODS!

Introduce salt and GOOD bacteria into the diet – such as organic live cultured yogurt, cheeses, keifers, sauerkraut and even naturally brewed organic beer!  All of these things help to stabilize the ecology of the gut and promote healing and repair.  Bad bacteria can’t live in salt and good bacteria from ferments can.  Put simply, good bacteria help to clean up the filth that has provided the perfect environment for the bad bacteria to live.

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